Comic book

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A comic book (or comic) is a collection, in a book or magazine, of comic strips with a collective theme. Comics are generally illustrated pictures with explainative text added for character lines and story commentary. Oftentimes comics will have a contunous story throughout. The word comic often refer to a periodical publication centered on a theme, person (usually fictional), place, world or group, written in the comic format.

Comics quickly evolved from comic strips, and the evolution of the comic format continues today. Influential writers in the first wave were for example Walt Disney, whose comics and cartoons were early smash hits with Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and other famous comic-book characters. Innovative comic writers such as Frank Miller, Alan Moore, and Neil Gaiman has done much to revive the art of comic writing with their Batman and Sandman renditions. Much new development of the comic genre originated in Japan during the 1980s and the 1990s, resulting in legendary works such as Akira. In Japan and abroad, Japanese comics go by the name of manga. This development was strongly connected to the emergence of anime.

Some Comic Books have gained massive recognition and garnered their creators impressive awards, such as with Art Spiegelman's "Maus," which won the Pulitzer Prize.

Famous comics are for example: Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Batman, Lone Wolf and Cub, Tintin, the Phantom and Superman.

Lesser known are for example The Beano and Whizzer and Chips.

A listing of comic books

Belgium

France

Japan

The Netherlands

United States

D.C. Comics

Marvel Comics

Others

United Kingdom

DC Thompson

Others

For a discussion of what comic books and comic strips have in common, see comic books and strips.