Foreign relations of Afghanistan

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Foreign relations of Afghanistan:

Disputes - The current Taliban regime subscribes to an extreme form of Islam that is seen by most in the moslem world to go beyond the teachings of the Koran. This has caused outside aid to this war torn country to be limited. One of the issues is the roles of women, as the Taliban regime suscribes to the belief that women should not work, should not be schooled, and must be under the direct guidence of men.

According to a strict interpretation of the Quran, the only proper government is one of Islam. In this view, it is correct to use force to change the beliefs of others, and that non-believers that should either be converted or be put to death as infidels. While not openly espoused by the Talban, they are seen to support Islamic militants worldwide that have similar views.

There is also a question over which group should hold Afghanistan's seat at the UN.

Illicit drugs: In 2000, Afghanistan was the world's largest illicit opium producer, surpassing Burma (potential production in 1999 - 1,670 metric tons; cultivation in 1999 - 51,500 hectares, a 23% increase over 1998); a major source of hashish; increasing number of heroin-processing laboratories being set up in the country; major political factions in the country profit from drug trade.

In 2001, the Taliban, which controls most of the country, instuted a number of decrees, or fatwas that have greatly concerned the outside world. Among them was the removal or destruction of all religious icons from the country, making the conversion of Muslims to other faiths punishable by death, banning the sale and distribution of opium, and the banning of the Internet in Afganistan.


Diplomatic Representation

From Afghanistan

German police recently (2001) shut down an unauthorised Taliban embassy operating in Germany.

The Islamic State of Afghanistan operates embassies in several surrounding Central Asian countries.

The Taliban government has an embassy in Pakistan.

To the United States

note: embassy operations suspended August 21, 1997
chief of mission: Ambassador (vacant)
chancery:

2341 Wyoming Avenue NW,
Washington, DC 20008

telephone: [1] (202) 234-3770
FAX: [1] (202) 328-3516
consulate(s) general: New York

To Afghanistan

The only embassy in Kabul is the rebel embassy of Chechnya.

Lakhdar Brahimi is (2001) the Special Representative to Afghanistan of the Secretary-General of the United Nations.